What’s in the latest Firefox upgrade? New defense against supercookies


Mozilla this week upgraded Firefox to version 85, adding to its overarching emphasis on privacy by isolating supercookies that some sites rely on to track users’ movements on the web.

Engineers also patched 13 vulnerabilities, five of which were marked “High,” Firefox’s second-most-serious label.

Firefox 85 can be downloaded for Windows, macOS, and Linux from Mozilla’s site. Because Firefox updates in the background, most users can simply relaunch the browser to get the latest version. To manually update on Windows, pull up the menu under the three horizontal bars at the upper right, then click the help icon (the question mark within a circle). Choose “About Firefox.” (On macOS, “About Firefox” can be found under the “Firefox” menu.) The resulting page shows that the browser is either up to date or displays the refresh process.

Mozilla upgrades Firefox every four weeks; the last refresh was on Dec. 15.

Stomping on supercookies

Other than the fixes for the baker’s dozen of security flaws, the most notable change in Firefox 85 is a behind-the-scenes expansion of Mozilla’s bet on privacy.

“In Firefox 85, we’re introducing a fundamental change in the browser’s network architecture to make all of our users safer: we now partition network connections and caches by the website being visited,” said Steven Englehardt and Arthur Edelstein, senior privacy engineer and senior product manager, privacy and security, in a Jan. 26 post to a Mozilla blog. “Trackers can abuse caches to create supercookies and can use connection identifiers to track users. But by isolating caches and network connections to the website they were created on, we make them useless for cross-site tracking.”



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